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20100101
20100131
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
at the copenhagen conference proved one thing beyond all doubt. green business is big business and the car industry knows that better than anyone. if they want to stay on the road to success they have to be sustainable. and one of the worlds leading auto making countries - germany is taking the development of green cars very seriously. >>reporter: its a fair bet that karl benz would both be proud and appalled in equal measure at what his invention has brought to the world. mercedes benz cars had come to symbolise both status and gas guzzling excess....as do all the luxury german brands. all have taken a hit in the economic downturn....but at a different level from other carmakers: >>pieper: we have this deep recession even in the premium car business...which is a new phenomenon.. .weve never seen this before... so this makes them suffer...but suffer on a high level, so to say. bmw is atbreak even, even in this recession ...audi is making money...porsche is making nice money...even inthe recession. and mercedes has made losses over two quarters...this...and they come out probably the second half. >>
with relation -- prime minister vladimir putin. he also talked about the recent copenhagen conference -- climate change conference, saying he was not happy with the results of the conference. >> good afternoon. over this year, you have repeatedly met up with our colleagues and tv networks and have discussed relevant issues of economic politics. we're grateful for you to discuss the of doing your live with these three networks. we do have something to talk about and something to remember and something to discuss 2009 has not been an easy year. to this country has come up against new challenges. how do see the outgoing year? what have with the able to do? >> this year has been very complicated. it has brought a significant amount of drama. i believe that all of our citizens have had a difficult year. the most important outcome is that we have stood our ground, we have overcome, we have continued to develop and we have paid what is a relatively small price for the international financial economic crisis that has swept the planet. in terms of what we have been able to accomplish, i believe that thes
not done all it can do to bring the international community to a deal in copenhagen and beyond copenhagen. and of course on the economic end, there is a sense that africa's resources are being extracted at all costs and that the people on the continent, those in communities on whose land resources lie, are still being marginalized, still being seen as invisible, even with obama in the white house. >> i guess that she pointed out the disappointments. what successes would we point to on the part of the administration? >> i would start by saying i wouldn't characterize it as disappointments. they are more concerns. i just got back from three weeks in west africa where it is evident there is still a great deal of hope. i would say president obama has a great deal of political capital spent on the continent. but in terms of successes, to me i think one of the biggest success cases is the fact that in his first year as a president, he visited the continent and we s the secretary of state visit -- spend ten days on the continent and visited over seven countries. this was quite significant.os the
for human beings? and means we may not be able to stop this. we may go to copenhagen and we may say, let's vote for this or let's vote to vote for this at some other time. let's cap emissions. let's see if we can slow this down. that the chances are we won't. the chances are we won't -- there won't be coming out of copenhagen a massive intention to stop global warming. meanwhile, talking about it but it's not going to happen easily or quickly. so while we are looking eyecare is not necessarily the elimination of human race. but we're still looking at the elimination of the polar bear. this is the cover of newsweek. the polar god itself with a lot of effort and with a lot of congregationalists. got himself a twist in agony endangered species, which means you cannot shoot them in the united states. people can shoot them in canada and in russia and england, but you can shoot them in america. you can't bring the carcass of the polar bear you shot them roust into the united states. i met someone in the united states was on this this very trip that i'm about to tell you about. we were on the s
the environment now. >> there are some pretty compelling concerns. there is the copenhagen accord. people are wondering what this is. there is an agreement but it is not legally binding. >> it is important. an important step forward. it certainly is not all we were seeking. it is not yet a legally binding accord. that is where we hope this will eventually go. there are some important steps forward. all of the countries are recognizing this is a problem. we had a big battle until very recently. they were denying that had anything to do about their emissions. we have been asking about this for about four years. everybody is now incorrect i think the objectives are not going to satisfy all of the environmental groups. if countries hole to these objectives, they will make meaningful progress. >> canada was getting beating ten up about this. >> these are the environmental groups that have always attacked our governments and others and they are unhappy with the accords. governments have to balance progress with growth. these are not easy questions. we have a position that is held, but all count
that it is really a problem, and i think also, the really effective work that was done in copenhagen and trying to get the chinese and the indians in particular on board, because that's a big argument that the opponents make, is that, you know, we're going to do all this, we're going to, you know, raise our energy prices, we're going to make it harder to do business and then china and india are going to go take advantage of that and use that as a competitive advantage and we're going to lose more jobs, so -- but there are lots and lots of examples on both sides of effective messaging and ineffective and i think professor griffin will talk about that later. he'll probably give you a lot more insight into it too. yeah. >> we talked about -- [inaudible] -- if so, why and if you've seen advantages or disadvantages to that or not being a federally registered lobbyist and working through them instead. >> well, i've only been doing this for two years and in the two years i've been doing it, the rules have been very clear, so you know, there is -- there's really not much gray in what i do. you know, i'
in copenhagen where you saw president obama having to wrestle with all these tensions. can you imagine the nerve it took to walk into closed-door sessions as the president blowing at diplomatic protocol, wrenching the copenhagen assembly out of its original approach and into something new and doing this not knowing if it was going to work. in the article, i wrote about an important moment for president obama and he would get to this one way or another. this would be in the summer of 1864 near the end of president lincoln's first term. he reelection campaign is going and it is not going well. in fact, he in of the political experts in the country think he is going to lose. furthermore they think he is going to lose to general mcclellan who will not pursue lankan score policies in the civil war. lincoln, at that point, is living with the idea that he said hundreds of thousands of young men to their deaths for a failed war. he will be known as the president to failed to hold the union together. he is getting up every morning with that knowledge, living with a wife who was, frankly at times, psychot
the stage for further cooperation with china in preparation for the copenhagen conference on climate change. he discussed exchange rates and trade, clean energy, military to military exchanges, human rights, and stopping the spread of nuclear weapons. we outline the key of compliments of the visit in a joint statement issued by president obama and president hu jintao on november 17. it has been said before that in order to get china right, you have to get the region right. the united states is a vital contributor to asian security and economic prosperity. our active presence in asia helps promote regional security and stability. we intend to deepen our engagement and strengthen our leadership in the region by strengthening our commitments to allies and partners, and enhancing our involvement in regional institutions. and the secretary addressed these issues, as well as our presence in the region, in an important speech in honolulu yesterday. the president's trip to china demonstrates that fact in the region demonstrate the importance we place on east asia which remains vital to u.s. securit
in town for a few days, and i was wondering if i could say hi to the doctor. is he in? he's in copenhagen. oh, well, that's nice. but you can still see him! you just said he was in... copenhagen. come on! that's pretty far. doc, look who's in town. ellen! copenhagen? cool, right? vacation. but still seeing patients. oh. [ whispering ] workaholic. i heard that. she said it. i... [ female announcer ] the new office. see it. live it. share it. on the human network. cisco. >>> gm is opening a new lithium-ion battery plant this morning with chairman and ceo ed whitaker in attendance. phil lebeau is there and he joins us now with what to expect. good morning, phil. >> reporter: good morning, becky. this is the star attraction, aside from ed whitaker talking with us today. this is the battery pack, the lithium-ion battery pack, going inside the volt and other electric vehicles that general motors plans to be making from here on forward. production actually starts today. this is a big deal for general motors because they have sunk a lot of their future bets into this plant being a success. again,
on president obama. he talked about the recent copenhagen climate change conference, stating he was unhappy with the result of the conference. this portion is about 45 minutes. >> we're grateful to discuss the outgoing year with the three networks. >> good afternoon, colleagues. indeed, we do have something to talk about and something to remember and something to discuss trade 2009 has not been an easy year. the country has come up against new challenges. how do you see the outgoing year? what have we been able to do that what we failed to do? >> this year has been very complicated. it has bought a significant amount of trauma. -- it has brought a significant amount of drama. the most important outcome as we have stood our ground, we have overcome, we have continued to develop, and we have paid what is a relatively small price for the international financial and economic crisis that has swept the planet. in terms of what we have been able to accomplish, i believe at least three things. first and most important, we have maintain social stability. we have secured the set of social tensions wh
briefly about it in copenhagen. i am worried about the bigger picture. the buy america provisions have cause some disruption. but the back -- the vast majority of our trade with united states is still your intent free beer the real problem is when you see country -- not just the united states -- using a stimulus package to bring in protectionist measures. we all know that what the biggest danger to the global recovery is the spread of protectionism. it has been global trade that has driven growth over the past generation. we would like to see that sustain going forward. we took the very opposite approach. we not only did not put any protectionist members -- measures but repeal -- repeal the number of terrorists in order to stimulate economic activity both here and abroad. that -- repeal of a number of terror acariffs in order to stie economic activity both here and abroad. >> that in many other topics still to come. >> mr. harper, please do something about the environment now. >> is also compelling concerns there about the environment, prime minister. there is a copenhagen accord, but
, such as the u.n. human rights council, and was recently the copenhagen climate change conference, which demonstrated spectacularly the fatuousness of such international structures, eye of common purpose, a common interest,, and governance. and yet the value of these international institutions and paper agreements seems to leave no lasting impression. did we really learn nothing from the early 20th-century experience, with its repeated and dimmed attempts to regulate the capital ships of the great powers for unable conferences? did we really learn nothing from the kellogg pact, whose signatories incidently included germany and japan? it abolished war forever. and inserted a that the u.s. secretary of state won the nobel peace prize. sound familiar? but at least they ashley sign be useless treaty. obama got it for imagined useless treaty, most notably the one he has been insisting on from prague to new york on universal nuclear disarmament. the night it of obama can be seen in his most recent poll, the dramatic -- the most dramatic of which appeared on september 24, one day after obama sp
of copenhagen he walked into a meeting supposed to be a bilateral with china, the chinese were trying to elevate him and he broke in and sat next to llewelyn from brazil, changed the game and got the deal, the five power deal with ever and it's perfectly fits this narrative of obama savings the day of what would have been complete disaster and i don't want to get into great detail but i've noticed this in the cuba policy i tracked closely even up to two or three days before the summit of the americas jeffrey, ambassador, former ambassador to mexico was essentially delivering, excuse this, richard, the neoconservative line of latin america. there was no evidence they were willing to say to diprete position where obama is coming. when he got the portfolio 180-degree shift in the direction comes of this is interesting you set up one attention challenges you got to be losing terribly to get his attention but when you do get his attention there is a very need almost to actually fundamentally change the dynamics and feel that and when you get this access show the narrative in the stories. >> i judge t
of the 2-20 was the shape of the emerging world. i looked back to the scene at copenhagen where the president burst into the room, but who is in the room? brazil, india, china, what is the arrangement of these new power arrangements? secondly, looking forward to the end of his first term, what is it reasonable to ask of this president in shaping what is reasonable to ask of this president in shaping -- >> what is reasonable to ask of this president in shaping this presidency. >> i am not so sure that it is a post american world. -- post-american world. we aren't indispensable nation, -- we are an indispensable nation. in asia, i thought that the coverage of obama's relations with asia was poor. when he came back from asia, the prime minister of india came to the white house for a state visit and obama is effectively in certain the united states into haitian politics and recognizing the degree to which of the rising powers of asia turned to the united states for some kind of leverage and balance. . . obama seems to be moving toward this new alignment. personally, i think this rei
in copenhagen where he said, the problem is the white people in the world. the second question is there is a country -- a company in brazil that is an offshore drilling company that in june, the obama administration gave a $15 billion loan to and i think is quite ironic that in february, george soros bought majority shares in that company. effectively, this administration has paid back george soros for getting elected with taxpayer funds. guest: i do not know anything about the second issue, but i can comment on the first. the brazilian president is a colorful, charismatic leader. then he has been for some to, to a half years. very annoyed that they have had to do things that the united states and europe-not have to do. and he has -- have not had to do. and he has been very open about saying that they have not had to do things that they've had to do in developing countries. host: salt lake city, democratic cruller. caller: we have -- and democratic collar. host: we have more natural gas than any of the country. wyoming has a huge amount. we have not even put pipelines for the n
, of course, to various parties such as the u.n. human rights council and the copenhagen climate change conference which demonstrated spectacularly the fatuousness of such international structures, the lack of common purpose, interest, and governance. yet, the failure of these international institutions and paper agreements seems to leave no lasting impression. did we really learn nothing from the early 20th century experience? did we really learn nothing from the kellogg pact whose signatories included germany and japan that abolished war forever? it won kellogg the peace prize in 1929. sound familiar? at least he got it for an actually signed useless treaty. obama got it for the imagined it useless treaty's most notably the one he has been insisting on for universal nuclear disarmament. the deaths of obama's 98 internationalism can be seen in his pursuit of this deeply and serious blow. this occurred on september 24th, one day after his speech to the general assembly when he asked -- when he ostentatiously presided over the security council, the first time an american president has ev
manifestations. the united nations, the various parties, and most recently, the copenhagen conference, which demonstrated the fatuousness of such international structures. çóyet this seems to leave no lasting impression. we really have learned nothing from the early 20th-Ñicentury experience, from repeated and doomed attempts to regulate the capital shifts of the great powers. did we learn nothing from the kellogg pact that abolished war forever, with a certainty that one frank keller look at the nobel peace prize in 1929? sound familiar? but i believe kellogg actually signed a treaty. [laughter] obama got it over imagined useless treaties, like those insisted on for nuclear disarmament. the best of the internationalism can be seen in the pursuit of the global, the most dramatic instance of which occurred on september 24, one day after obama's speech to the general assembly where he ostentatiously addressed to the security council. obama had knowledge thadr iran had constructed a secret uranium enrichment facility. the french and british were urging him to use that study at the council to
instance, the president of the united states removes himself to copenhagen to bring home the chicago olympics. it removes himself to copenhagen for climate change. he removes himself to oslo to receive a prize, but he doesn't show up in berlin on the 20th anniversary of an event of biblical proportion, one that i'm sure most of us in the room would never imagine we would ever see. that shows you how he sees the world, reinforces that quotation. i mean, i could have used one of dozens. but the one i chose it from was the address of the general assembly, in which you can see his priorities. and to speak of the cold war divisions, sort of arbitrary and not to see how rooted they were in the fundamental values of the united states and the west, as cleavages of some obsolete conflict, is simply staggering. but it tells you a lot about his worldview. and i thought the berlin event was very, very telling. particularly, as you say, leaving out the great figures that reagan, thatcher, pope john paul, sharansky, sakharov, and others. gorbachev was the hapless caretaker. to his credit come he d
ahead. caller: are you aware of the president's -- the brazilian president's speech in copenhagen where he said, the problem is the white people in the world. the second question is there is a country -- a company in brazil that is an offshore drilling company that in june, the obama administration gave a $15 billion loan to and i think is quite ironic that in february, george soros bought majority shares in that company. effectively, this administration has paid back george soros for getting elected with taxpayer funds. guest: i do not know anything about the second issue, but i can comment on the first. the brazilian president is a colorful, charismatic leader. then he has been for some to, to a half years. very annoyed that they have had to do things that the united states and europe-not have to do. and he has -- have not had to do. and he has been very open about saying that they have not had to do things that they've had to do in developing countries. host: salt lake city, democratic cruller. caller: we have -- and democratic collar. host: we have more natural gas than any of the c
's -- the brazilian president's speech in copenhagen where he said, the problem is the white people in the world. the second question is there is a country -- a company in brazil that is an offshore drilling company that in june, the obama administration gave a $15 billion loan to and i think is quite ironic that in february, george soros bought majority shares in that company. effectively, this administration has paid back george soros for getting elected with taxpayer funds. guest: i do not know anything about the second issue, but i can comment on the first. the brazilian president is a colorful, charismatic leader. then he has been for some to, to a half years. very annoyed that they have had to do things that the united states and europe-not have to do. and he has -- have not had to do. and he has been very open about saying that they have not had to do things that they've had to do in developing countries. host: salt lake city, democratic cruller. caller: we have -- and democratic collar. host: we have more natural gas than any of the country. wyoming has a huge amount. we have not even pu
in pittsburgh. the g-20 agreed to phase out fossil fuel subsidies at copenhagen. for the first time all major economies accepted their responsibility to take future action. the president ago noled this is not enough -- acknowledged this is not enough and we'll continue our efforts to provide the leadership that is required in this important and challenging area. all of this is, of course, just the start. our challenge now is to sustain and build on the start that has been made this year. there are no shortages of challenges to test us, north korea, iran, arab-israeli peace, al qaeda and its affiliates in afghanistan and pakistan specifically, and around the world jeanly. so now let me turn very briefly to the afghan-pakistan strategy and exactly where we are today. in review of our efforts in afghanistan and pakistan this fall, the president asked some very difficult and tough questions, challenged assumptions and heard from every perspective and explored every option. most importantly, this was a review that never lost sight of those affected most by presidential decisions, and that's the me
see yesterday the guy that drew the mohammed bomb was attacked in his barn in copenhagen with an axe and a knife. it's - you know i mean if you can't even draw a cartoon about mo' ham ed who's not god, it's ridiculous. have you ever showed the cartoon on c-span? you can't let these people control us. i think you should show it. host: we did years ago. it's been three or four years though. caller: i don't know. salmon rush ty probably still has a hide out. these people - the so-called muslims that aren't extremists. can't speak out against them because that's against the koran. they'll kill you. see what it says. i don't see a lot of people speaking out against the religion because they can't do it. it's scary. host: thanks for the call. front page story. obama ties al qaeda to the plane scare. the president back at the white house tomorrow. ben from north carolina. good morning. is yemen the new front on terrorism? caller: i think since the place is no bigger than it is, the town of whatever it is, i think we should blow them off the map because that's where all these people are
days about what we're going to do. >> mr. speaker, during in mind the failure of copenhagen and the current weather cycle which clearly educate a cooling trend [laughter] [crowd shouting] while the prime minister -- will the prime minister -- >> order. the more noise the less progress made. >> will the prime minister reconsider the proposed wasteful expenditure of 100 alien pounds on offshore wind which will be delivering sufficient energy and result in excessively exorbitant charges for electricity users area >> mr. speaker, the idea to take a lead on climate change when they can't even convince their own backbench what is necessary. mr. speaker, they can't make up their mind about nuclear. now i'm not sure when we are the leading power in the world for offshore wind. we will soon be making announcements that will make it clear that massive numbers of jobs will come as a result of offshore wind. it is a right policy of were going to have 15 renewable by 2020. i cannot understand well the conservative energy policy comes from if they take out nuclear and they take out offsho
of this phase i really enjoyed drawing. he is back in the news now with the copenhagen accord. this is al gore. he has this very distinctive shape to his head a kind of goes one line like this, and then the other line like this. that is where you start with al gore. then you give them this hair, very reagan-esque hair that goes like this. he has the years a spot from star trek. -- the years of spock -- the ears of spock. he has kind of an elvis-like mouth that goes like this. already, you can start to see it is beginning to look like him a little bit, right? but the keep it is people often say he lost the 2000 election because of florida. a few hundred votes in florida. i say that was not it. he lost the election because he has the eyes of death. that is al gore for you. what do you think? am i right? yes, that is al gore. it does not help with this mole sticking out of his neck right there. so i will sign this one here. here you go. for you. let's get another character with a distinctive bass. john kerry. long face, right? here is the face. the face starts of here. long face. long face. long
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)